Anwar - Last comments http://nonplatonic.com/anwar.php?disp=comments en-US hourly 1 2000-01-01T12:00+00:00 In response to: Have you guys tried Annonzilla? http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=have_you_guys_tried_annonzilla&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c4142 2007-02-22T02:36:54Z collin [Member] Is this for Cate? Does it have anything to do with my poor speeling? In response to: Have you guys tried Annonzilla? http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=have_you_guys_tried_annonzilla&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c4141 2007-02-22T02:16:19Z anwar [Member] The annotations stay loaded -- but if the dynamic page changes, the region information [for the given annotation] will be lost. ]]> In response to: No Walled Garden for Me http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=no_walled_garden_for_me_1&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c4137 2007-02-18T05:49:29Z ben [Member] I'm actually pretty sold on the usefulness of Blackberries. I like how it polls the mail server... now if it weren't all proprietary with the mailness... and if it only had a camera... and the ability to run programs I write... and... wait, I just want a Windows Mobile phone... damnit. In response to: You can't cross the same river twice http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=you_can_t_cross_the_same_river_twice&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c3996 2006-10-06T02:44:11Z scott [Member] This comment is a little late, but when I first saw this post I was for some reason too retarded to remember how to log in. I went back to Stanford shortly after moving back out here... it was strange. You do an excellent job of putting the feeling into words; your post really captures how I felt. (And in so doing, makes me feel a little better about feeling that way.)
I went back to Stanford shortly after moving back out here... it was strange. You do an excellent job of putting the feeling into words; your post really captures how I felt. (And in so doing, makes me feel a little better about feeling that way.)]]>
In response to: Single Pipe Steam Heating http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=single_pipe_steam_heating&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c3911 2006-08-04T12:53:53Z collin [Member] So... buy an ugly radiator, from England, that doesn't work with steam. Makes sense. In response to: Single Pipe Steam Heating http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=single_pipe_steam_heating&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c3909 2006-08-04T07:57:50Z ben [Member] -designer-radiators.com
-designer-radiators.com
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In response to: Single Pipe Steam Heating http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=single_pipe_steam_heating&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c3902 2006-08-03T14:42:39Z collin [Member] So I guess those thermostats won't work. Are your radiators angled? In response to: Consolidation... http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=consolidation&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c3888 2006-07-30T18:04:35Z collin [Member] Hey, you forgot Transmeta. What were those anyway? Below the x86 translation layer that is. In response to: Consolidation... http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=consolidation&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c3881 2006-07-28T19:17:06Z anwar [Member] Freescale and TI have exited the high-performance cpu markets. They still manufacture embedded chips.
They still manufacture embedded chips.
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In response to: Consolidation... http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=consolidation&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c3878 2006-07-28T08:55:34Z ben [Member] Motorola and TI are still in there, right? Things that run Mobile 5.0: HP iPAQ 2490     Intel PXA270 520MHz Dell Axim X51v     Intel XScale PXA270 624MHz HP iPAQ RX 1950     Samsung SC32442 300MHz HP iPAQ HW 6515     Intel PXA270 312Mhz These are all wacky RISC processors, right? Do they count? Motorola and TI are still in there, right?

Things that run Mobile 5.0:

HP iPAQ 2490     Intel PXA270 520MHz
Dell Axim X51v     Intel XScale PXA270 624MHz
HP iPAQ RX 1950     Samsung SC32442 300MHz
HP iPAQ HW 6515     Intel PXA270 312Mhz

These are all wacky RISC processors, right? Do they count?

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In response to: Consolidation... http://nonplatonic.com/index.php?blog=4&title=consolidation&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c3877 2006-07-28T08:26:07Z ben [Member] My god, it's bad enough that I'm awake... what are you doing up... other than decrying the death of the Alpha that is... In response to: Classic SOM Design http://nonplatonic.com/anwar.php?title=classic_som_design&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c447 2005-06-30T05:35:21Z graham [Member] It sounds like they spent about 30 seconds coming up with a name for the building. In response to: I don't need no stinkin' gubmint. http://nonplatonic.com/anwar.php?title=i_don_t_need_no_stinkin_gubmint&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c320 2005-06-08T07:31:49Z collin [Member] My favorite part... I will be pro-death penalty and anti-abortion, pro-child but anti-child care, for education but against funding of public schools. As an aside, I read this Mallard Fillmore comic in today's [?] Boston Globe. I don't really read it that often [not carried in Denver/Chicago papers?] but it seems kinda asinine to say the least. Although looking at the quote and comparing it to the comic, objectively they aren't that different [besides the objective fact that Republicans are evil]. Maybe I just expect my editorial cartoons to be, well, on the editorial page.
I will be pro-death penalty and anti-abortion, pro-child but anti-child care, for education but against funding of public schools.


As an aside, I read this Mallard Fillmore comic in today's [?] Boston Globe. I don't really read it that often [not carried in Denver/Chicago papers?] but it seems kinda asinine to say the least. Although looking at the quote and comparing it to the comic, objectively they aren't that different [besides the objective fact that Republicans are evil]. Maybe I just expect my editorial cartoons to be, well, on the editorial page.]]>
In response to: Global supply chains http://nonplatonic.com/anwar.php?title=global_supply_chains&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c150 2005-04-22T08:45:17Z ben [Member] ...and in the 60's Arthur C. Clarke was talking about how WWIII was impossible because of ever increasing international trade. This is not a new idea. In response to: Global supply chains http://nonplatonic.com/anwar.php?title=global_supply_chains&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c148 2005-04-22T06:56:44Z collin [Member] In an earlier book I argued that the extent to which countries tied their economies and futures to global integration and trade would act as a restraint on going to war with their neighbours. I first started thinking about this in the late 1990s, when, during my travels, I noticed that no two countries that both had McDonald's had ever fought a war against each other since each got its McDonald's. (Border skirmishes and civil wars don't count, because McDonald's usually served both sides.) After confirming this with McDonald's, I offered what I called the Golden Arches Theory of Conflict Prevention. The Golden Arches Theory stipulated that when a country reached the level of economic development where it had a middle class big enough to support a network of McDonald's, it became a McDonald's country. And people in McDonald's countries didn't like to fight wars any more. They preferred to wait in line for burgers. In an earlier book I argued that the extent to which countries tied their economies and futures to global integration and trade would act as a restraint on going to war with their neighbours. I first started thinking about this in the late 1990s, when, during my travels, I noticed that no two countries that both had McDonald's had ever fought a war against each other since each got its McDonald's. (Border skirmishes and civil wars don't count, because McDonald's usually served both sides.) After confirming this with McDonald's, I offered what I called the Golden Arches Theory of Conflict Prevention. The Golden Arches Theory stipulated that when a country reached the level of economic development where it had a middle class big enough to support a network of McDonald's, it became a McDonald's country. And people in McDonald's countries didn't like to fight wars any more. They preferred to wait in line for burgers.]]> In response to: Cuba, US, Health http://nonplatonic.com/anwar.php?title=cuba_us_health&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c120 2005-04-14T08:32:16Z ben [Member] My original point with the error bars was more that you need to know something about the relative sizes of the populations. Also, I think the best way to model it is to treat the population as drawn uniformly from an infinite distribution since drawing a full population from a finite distribution would conglomerate additional stochastic processes with example selection. I don't know if that made any sense... I'm not sure how to explain what I'm thinking.
Also, I think the best way to model it is to treat the population as drawn uniformly from an infinite distribution since drawing a full population from a finite distribution would conglomerate additional stochastic processes with example selection. I don't know if that made any sense... I'm not sure how to explain what I'm thinking.]]>
In response to: Cuba, US, Health http://nonplatonic.com/anwar.php?title=cuba_us_health&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c119 2005-04-14T04:02:04Z collin [Member] So Marco, you contend that even in the US the government is aware of every birth? This is the problem with statistics (as opposed to probability theory), in the real world you cannot measure an entire population. I'm not saying that there are huge error bars on something like the infant mortality rate in a country like the US, but they're still there. Basically my point is that there will allways be sample error. And as for something like "Life Expectancy at Birth," Jesus H. Christ that's complicated. Seriously, how is this computed? If it's just "for what age x are half the people of that were born in year now-x still alive" then "life expectancy at birth" is a horrible misnomer. I can't think of a sussinct explination of the extrapolations needed to make that phrase meaningful, but hopefully you can see my point. Ergo, I vote that error bars are needed for these measures to be meaningful. Do any of you know how you construct error bars for a sample when you don't know the size of the population? Things like this have never been explained to me with the rigor I want in order to believe them.
And as for something like "Life Expectancy at Birth," Jesus H. Christ that's complicated. Seriously, how is this computed? If it's just "for what age x are half the people of that were born in year now-x still alive" then "life expectancy at birth" is a horrible misnomer. I can't think of a sussinct explination of the extrapolations needed to make that phrase meaningful, but hopefully you can see my point. Ergo, I vote that error bars are needed for these measures to be meaningful. Do any of you know how you construct error bars for a sample when you don't know the size of the population? Things like this have never been explained to me with the rigor I want in order to believe them.]]>
In response to: Cuba, US, Health http://nonplatonic.com/anwar.php?title=cuba_us_health&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c116 2005-04-13T21:18:59Z devin [Member] Ben wrote: Comparing the numbers without error bars is pretty meaningless... though the samples are probably the entire population of a country, so the errors are very small. Marco wrote: I do wonder how realistic it is to assume that the statistics are compiled by counting all births and deaths (or whatever you're counting). It's true that, at least in this country and probably most developed countries, birth records and death records are routinely kept As Marco points out, sample error is not the issue; systematic error is, especially in developing countries. In fact, Cuba's reported mortality rate rose during the early 60s. This is because afte the revolution, the Ministry of Public Health improved data gathering. (Source: Waitzkin, Howard. _At the Front Lines of Medicine_, a book I'm trying to slog through right now). In the case of Cuba, the Former Soviet Union, et. al. there is also the issue of whether you trust the government to accurately report their mortality statistics. Comparing the numbers without error bars is pretty meaningless... though the samples are probably the entire population of a country, so the errors are very small. Marco wrote:
I do wonder how realistic it is to assume that the statistics are compiled by counting all births and deaths (or whatever you're counting). It's true that, at least in this country and probably most developed countries, birth records and death records are routinely kept

As Marco points out, sample error is not the issue; systematic error is, especially in developing countries. In fact, Cuba's reported mortality rate rose during the early 60s. This is because afte the revolution, the Ministry of Public Health improved data gathering. (Source: Waitzkin, Howard. _At the Front Lines of Medicine_, a book I'm trying to slog through right now). In the case of Cuba, the Former Soviet Union, et. al. there is also the issue of whether you trust the government to accurately report their mortality statistics.

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In response to: Cuba, US, Health http://nonplatonic.com/anwar.php?title=cuba_us_health&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c115 2005-04-13T21:07:36Z marco [Member] Ben wrote: Comparing the numbers without error bars is pretty meaningless... though the samples are probably the entire population of a country, so the errors are very small. It depends on what you're counting. If the numbers truly come from the entire population (counting all deaths/births or whatever with reasonable accuracy) and if the statistic is something like "Infant mortality rate for 2004," then the statistics are population statistics so error bars would be meaningless. However, if you're trying to say something about the sustained rate over a period of years, then you could treat each year's rate as a data point, or you could use sampling to estimate the birth and death rates over a period of 20 years. I do wonder how realistic it is to assume that the statistics are compiled by counting all births and deaths (or whatever you're counting). It's true that, at least in this country and probably most developed countries, birth records and death records are routinely kept. But there are plenty of people outside of the system, especially the very poor and illegal immigrants, who wouldn't necessarily be recorded. I wonder how they come up with numbers for those people.
Comparing the numbers without error bars is pretty meaningless... though the samples are probably the entire population of a country, so the errors are very small.

It depends on what you're counting. If the numbers truly come from the entire population (counting all deaths/births or whatever with reasonable accuracy) and if the statistic is something like "Infant mortality rate for 2004," then the statistics are population statistics so error bars would be meaningless. However, if you're trying to say something about the sustained rate over a period of years, then you could treat each year's rate as a data point, or you could use sampling to estimate the birth and death rates over a period of 20 years.

I do wonder how realistic it is to assume that the statistics are compiled by counting all births and deaths (or whatever you're counting). It's true that, at least in this country and probably most developed countries, birth records and death records are routinely kept. But there are plenty of people outside of the system, especially the very poor and illegal immigrants, who wouldn't necessarily be recorded. I wonder how they come up with numbers for those people.]]>
In response to: Cuba, US, Health http://nonplatonic.com/anwar.php?title=cuba_us_health&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c114 2005-04-13T20:37:44Z ben [Member] Comparing the numbers without error bars is pretty meaningless... though the samples are probably the entire population of a country, so the errors are very small. I've seen the median used as a single indicator because it is less susceptible to bias from any outliers. Then there's the question of what sort of quality we are considering. I would guess that in countries with socialized healthcare, the care an individual receives varies less than in a country without socialized healthcare. My guess would be that the US has higher quality healthcare, but it is not available to everyone. I wonder what happens if you consider the statistics for the US population with health insurance, or with some minimal quality of health insurance. Then there are dietary and exercise considerations...
I've seen the median used as a single indicator because it is less susceptible to bias from any outliers.

Then there's the question of what sort of quality we are considering. I would guess that in countries with socialized healthcare, the care an individual receives varies less than in a country without socialized healthcare. My guess would be that the US has higher quality healthcare, but it is not available to everyone. I wonder what happens if you consider the statistics for the US population with health insurance, or with some minimal quality of health insurance.

Then there are dietary and exercise considerations...]]>